Mental health nurses set to work with police called out to emergencies in new scheme.

Mental health nurses set to work with police called out to emergencies in new scheme.

Recent statistics have shown that 1 in 4 incidents attended by Lancashire police are related to mental health. Because of this rising number mental health nurses are set to work alongside police in Lancashire for the first time to help those involved in emergency incidents.

Specialist nurses will also work in the force control room to help 999 calls that come on to help those ringing with problems related to mental help. This will mean that people will be able to receive immediate help. It is hoped that by implementing this strategy it will mean patients will be treated over the phone or in their home saving them a trip to a police station or hospital.

This new scheme has already proved to be successful in Cheshire, where, since implementing the scheme, there has been a 90% fall in Section 136 Mental Health Act police detentions.

Lancashire Constabulary Assistant Chief Constable Mark Bates said: “We receive all sorts of calls where mental health is a factor, from those just calling for someone to speak to because they are lonely and depressed to people threatening to commit suicide. This scheme is about taking action and supporting people at the earliest opportunity to prevent problems rather than responding to them.”

The initiative in Lancashire has been funded by Blackburn with Darwen and Chorley and South Ribble Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) and the police innovation fund (PIF) with mental health nurses from Lancashire Care Foundation TrustManchesterEveningNews